Session I – June 18 – June 22: Click here for the online interactive schedule or click here for the PDF.

Session II – June 25 – July13: Click here for the online interactive schedule or click here for the PDF.

Session III – July 16 – July 27: Click here for the online interactive schedule or click here for the PDF.

Click on the course you are interested in to see the course description.

Session I: June 18 – June 22
SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday
7:00
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Shacharit at Kotel
Bus leaves CY at 7am and returns at 8:45
7:00
8:45
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
9:00
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
12:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
14:00
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
“I am spiritual by not religious”- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.

Faculty:
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
“I am spiritual by not religious”- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.

Faculty:
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
“I am spiritual by not religious”- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.

Faculty:
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
“I am spiritual by not religious”- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.

Faculty:
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
17:00
Mincha
17:00
17:15
Mincha
17:00
17:15
Mincha
17:00
17:15
Mincha
17:00
17:15
Mincha
17:00
17:15
Session II: June 25 – July 13
SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday
7:00
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Shacharit at Kotel
Bus leaves CY at 7am and returns at 8:45
7:00
8:45
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
9:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
12:00
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
13:00
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.

Faculty:
Rabbi Alan Iser
Talmud
Beginners & Intermediate
13:30
16:00
The Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?

Faculty:
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Love and Rape – A Look at Biblical Understanding of Sexual [Mis]conduct
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
13:30
16:00
Description:
Man and Woman were created for each other, but how should that relationship look and what does it look like when it goes wrong? We will study some of the biblical texts relevant to this question, and some texts that seem to comment through intertextuality on those sections.

Faculty:
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
Talmud
Beginners & Intermediate
13:30
16:00
Framing Human Rights
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
13:30
16:00
Description:
Human rights are a consensus based standard used to measure a government's treatment of people subject to its jurisdiction. The global movement for human rights is the most successful attempt in the history of the human species to achieve agreement on legal norms to protect all humans through the just rule of law. Today, people of every major religion, language, culture and country fight for human rights using these shared norms. The rhetoric and legal instruments developed to institute and protect these rights have developed over the 20th century. This course will provide an historical and conceptual introduction to human rights.

Faculty:
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.

Faculty:
Rabbi Alan Iser
Talmud
Beginners & Intermediate
13:30
16:00
The Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?

Faculty:
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Love and Rape – A Look at Biblical Understanding of Sexual [Mis]conduct
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
13:30
16:00
Description:
Man and Woman were created for each other, but how should that relationship look and what does it look like when it goes wrong? We will study some of the biblical texts relevant to this question, and some texts that seem to comment through intertextuality on those sections.

Faculty:
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
Talmud
Beginners & Intermediate
13:30
16:00
Framing Human Rights
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
13:30
16:00
Description:
Human rights are a consensus based standard used to measure a government's treatment of people subject to its jurisdiction. The global movement for human rights is the most successful attempt in the history of the human species to achieve agreement on legal norms to protect all humans through the just rule of law. Today, people of every major religion, language, culture and country fight for human rights using these shared norms. The rhetoric and legal instruments developed to institute and protect these rights have developed over the 20th century. This course will provide an historical and conceptual introduction to human rights.

Faculty:
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.

Faculty:
Rabbi Alan Iser
Talmud
Beginners & Intermediate
13:30
16:00
The Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?

Faculty:
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Our Children will be Our Guarantors – Intergenerational Conflict in the Jewish Tradition
Rabbi Andy Katz
16:15
17:30
Description:
While the big Jewish “Legacy Organizations” try to figure out how to engage millennials, some of the most engaged millennials are out there trying to break their power and influence. The conflict is ideological, but there is a profound intergenerational element. We will attempt to unpack and explore the issues involved using traditional sources.

Faculty:
Rabbi Andy Katz
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
TBD
Rabbi Joel Levy
16:15
17:30
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
ADAM: The Divine Human Image
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
16:15
17:30
Description:
At the core of Jewish thought stands a paradox: God is irreducibly Other, transcending human understanding, and yet also Loving Person – the “You” of “blessed are You”. The bible teaches that we are in the image of God (Gn 1:26) and that God appears in our image (Ez 1:26), but also that God transcends all likeness (Is 40:25). Both the Rambam and the Zohar embrace this paradox through developing an ideal of “higher humanity”. Reflecting this ideal in our bodies and lives is the purpose of Torah, the highest form of self-realization, and the greatest closeness to God. In this course, we will explore the ideal of higher humanity as it emerges in the mysticism of the Zohar and the philosophy of the Rambam.

Faculty:
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Text and Context: How the Art of Memory Explains Rabbinic Judaism and (Maybe) Our Future
Dr. Stephen Arnoff
16:15
17:30
Description:
In piecing together a new Judaism after the destruction of the Second Temple, the sages of late antiquity called upon the best technologies they could find to collect, cultivate, and teach Torah. This meant employing the Art of Memory, an ancient Greco-Roman system for inventorying cultural meaning and content for the iteration and invention of ideas that society required. We will look at where the Art of Memory comes from and how it works in the world of rabbinic text and context. Then we will think about the role of Jewish text and tradition in our age, a time when the Art of Memory converges with the Internet and virtual reality to reinvent Judaism yet again.

Faculty:
Dr. Stephen Arnoff
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Session III: July 16 – July 27
SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday
7:00
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Shacharit at Kotel
Bus leaves CY at 7am and returns at 8:45
7:00
8:45
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
Dvar Halacha
At CY
7:20
7:30
Shacharit
At CY
7:30
8:30
9:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
12:00
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
13:00
From “Don't seethe a calf in its mother's milk” to two sets of dishes – The rabbinic story of kashrut observance
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
13:30
16:00
Description:
In this course we will use the subject of the separation of meat and milk as a window into the development of the Jewish law (Halacha). We will examine sources from the Torah, through the rabbinic tradition into the medieval and contemporary development of these laws which govern the conduct of the observant Jew.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
European Academy for Jewish Liturgy
Chazan Jalda Rebling
13:30
16:00
Description:
Intensive course for prayer leaders. An intensive two week course on leading prayers on weekdays and shabbatot. The course will focus on how “nusach”, the music of prayer, helps to make tefilla a meangiful spiritual practice and how the Shaliach Tsibur, the prayer leader, lifts up their community in prayer.

Faculty:
Chazan Jalda Rebling
3 Modern Midrashim
Rabbi David Greenstein
13:30
16:00
Description:
Between the middle- to the late- 19th century three legends (midrashim) began circulating in the traditional Jewish world. It seemed that they were appearing for the first time, although they were considered ancient. Studying these texts in conjunction with classic sources, we will explore their fascinating pedigrees, the varied reactions to their surprise appearance, and consider what these “new” traditions tell us about the challenge of living as a Jew in the modern world.

Faculty:
Rabbi David Greenstein
European Academy for Jewish Liturgy
Chazan Jalda Rebling
13:30
16:00
Description:
Intensive course for prayer leaders. An intensive two week course on leading prayers on weekdays and shabbatot. The course will focus on how “nusach”, the music of prayer, helps to make tefilla a meangiful spiritual practice and how the Shaliach Tsibur, the prayer leader, lifts up their community in prayer.

Faculty:
Chazan Jalda Rebling
From “Don't seethe a calf in its mother's milk” to two sets of dishes – The rabbinic story of kashrut observance
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
13:30
16:00
Description:
In this course we will use the subject of the separation of meat and milk as a window into the development of the Jewish law (Halacha). We will examine sources from the Torah, through the rabbinic tradition into the medieval and contemporary development of these laws which govern the conduct of the observant Jew.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
European Academy for Jewish Liturgy
Chazan Jalda Rebling
13:30
16:00
Description:
Intensive course for prayer leaders. An intensive two week course on leading prayers on weekdays and shabbatot. The course will focus on how “nusach”, the music of prayer, helps to make tefilla a meangiful spiritual practice and how the Shaliach Tsibur, the prayer leader, lifts up their community in prayer.

Faculty:
Chazan Jalda Rebling
3 Modern Midrashim
Rabbi David Greenstein
13:30
16:00
Description:
Between the middle- to the late- 19th century three legends (midrashim) began circulating in the traditional Jewish world. It seemed that they were appearing for the first time, although they were considered ancient. Studying these texts in conjunction with classic sources, we will explore their fascinating pedigrees, the varied reactions to their surprise appearance, and consider what these “new” traditions tell us about the challenge of living as a Jew in the modern world.

Faculty:
Rabbi David Greenstein
European Academy for Jewish Liturgy
Chazan Jalda Rebling
13:30
16:00
Description:
Intensive course for prayer leaders. An intensive two week course on leading prayers on weekdays and shabbatot. The course will focus on how “nusach”, the music of prayer, helps to make tefilla a meangiful spiritual practice and how the Shaliach Tsibur, the prayer leader, lifts up their community in prayer.

Faculty:
Chazan Jalda Rebling
From “Don't seethe a calf in its mother's milk” to two sets of dishes – The rabbinic story of kashrut observance
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
13:30
16:00
Description:
In this course we will use the subject of the separation of meat and milk as a window into the development of the Jewish law (Halacha). We will examine sources from the Torah, through the rabbinic tradition into the medieval and contemporary development of these laws which govern the conduct of the observant Jew.

Faculty:
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
European Academy for Jewish Liturgy
Chazan Jalda Rebling
13:30
16:00
Description:
Intensive course for prayer leaders. An intensive two week course on leading prayers on weekdays and shabbatot. The course will focus on how “nusach”, the music of prayer, helps to make tefilla a meangiful spiritual practice and how the Shaliach Tsibur, the prayer leader, lifts up their community in prayer.

Faculty:
Chazan Jalda Rebling
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Advanced T’amei HaMikrah
Saralee Shrell-Fox
16:15
17:30
Description:
The Advanced T’amei HaMikrah Class invites those students who have already mastered Torah Reading and Haftarah, to move on to the Megillot! Come learn the T’amim, apply them to the text and take a recording of the trope back home with you. Participants will come away with the skills to already use in your communities following the CY Summer Session.

Faculty:
Saralee Shrell-Fox
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Elements of the Halakhic System
Rabbi Joel Roth
16:15
17:30
Description:
The course will be a basic introduction to the fundamental elements which govern the functioning of the halakhic system. It will include discussion of the following topics: the concepts “de-oraita” and “de-rabbanan,” their meaning, determination and relationship to each other; judicial discretion and precedent; the source and scope of rabbinic authority; rabbinic authority vis-à-vis matters de-oraita; custom; and patterns for change within halakhah.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Advanced T’amei HaMikrah
Saralee Shrell-Fox
16:15
17:30
Description:
The Advanced T’amei HaMikrah Class invites those students who have already mastered Torah Reading and Haftarah, to move on to the Megillot! Come learn the T’amim, apply them to the text and take a recording of the trope back home with you. Participants will come away with the skills to already use in your communities following the CY Summer Session.

Faculty:
Saralee Shrell-Fox
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Elements of the Halakhic System
Rabbi Joel Roth
16:15
17:30
Description:
The course will be a basic introduction to the fundamental elements which govern the functioning of the halakhic system. It will include discussion of the following topics: the concepts “de-oraita” and “de-rabbanan,” their meaning, determination and relationship to each other; judicial discretion and precedent; the source and scope of rabbinic authority; rabbinic authority vis-à-vis matters de-oraita; custom; and patterns for change within halakhah.

Faculty:
Rabbi Joel Roth
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15